10th Take Back Day Event Hits Hudson County, Last Year 309 Tons of Rx Drugs Collected

10th Take Back Day Event Hits Hudson County, Last Year 309 Tons of Rx Drugs Collected

It’s that time of year again, where you can turn in your unused prescription medications, no questions asked! The Take Back Event will be hosted in Hudson County, according to NJ. But why you ask? Millions have been exposed to opiates, and other prescription medications, from the confines of family members’ cabinets. The Take Back Event helps families and friends to ensure their prescriptions will not be sampled by curious teens, or others. Safely disposing of unused prescription medications is a hurdle in our nation, so to solve that six Hudson County Police Departments are helping to take back back what you didn’t mean to leave out there in the first place! Participating in the Take Back Event helps spread awareness about the dangers of leaving prescription medications unattended- which many people don’t stop to consider. (We didn’t exactly get an introductory course in this stuff for school!) The following Police Departments will have drop-off collection bins available for use in Hudson County, according to NJ:   Hoboken Police Department – 400 First St., Hoboken Hoboken Police Department – 106 Hudson St., Hoboken Hoboken Police Department – 221 Jackson St., Hoboken Hoboken Police Department – 311 13th St., Hoboken Kearny Police Department – 237 Laurel Ave., Kearny Bayonne Police Department – 630 Ave. C, Bayonne   If you have prescription medications laying around your bathroom, head on over to the event, and help spread addiction awareness everywhere!   What do you think about the Take Back...

What You Should Know About Marijuana Addiction

The war on drugs is coming to a close in America, and in the wake of the criminalization of drug crimes, medical and recreational marijuana are enjoying basking in the freedom of legally sanctified use in multiple states across the nation. At this point a federal authorization of marijuana nation wide is far from plausible, but in the coming decades that reality may manifest itself. According to Poloti Fact, marijuana entangles half of the people who use it on a daily basis in a deadly dance of addiction. Being dependant on marijuana and using marijuana are two different distinctions that are often blurred in the public’s eye. Those who are dependant on a substance are physically and psychologically reliant on a substance to feel normal. Additionally, addiction is usually coupled with needing an ever increasing amount of a substance, as the body’s tolerance deadens the effect of drugs over time. According to Politi Fact: “5.4 million people reported using marijuana daily or almost daily. A more detailed table. . . shows 2.69 million people — just shy of 2.7 million– with dependence on marijuana and hashish.”   Health Risks of Marijuana Increases your heart rate as much as two times its normal rate, possible ensuing a heart attack Increases bleeding Lowers blood pressure, and effects blood pressure Suppression of the immune system Reduced ability to retain and understand information Paranoia Shallow...

Naloxone, an Overdose Remediator, Encounters Opposition at UM

In the bustle of college life students have an unnerving penchant to get caught up with drugs, and are exposed to illicit, addictive substances that can cause a lifetime of upheaval and hardship. More than the mounting emotional derailment of drug addiction, there are serious health risks associated with illicit drug use. The starkly prominent danger of drug addiction, particularly with opiate addiction, is the likelihood of fatally overdosing. According to the Daily UM, the University of Washington has been denied access to lifesaving naloxone (also know as Narcan); there are stringent laws regulating the dissemination of naloxone, which are prohibiting institutions, such as universities, from possessing valuable tools when responding to overdoses on campus. This is a problem, and an unnecessary hazard for students who fall victim to overdose, and the community who is plagued by preventable deaths. Knowing the signs of an overdose are critical to administering treatment to avoid the devastating long term effects from an overdose, which can include blindness, loss of motor function, severe brain damage (from lack oxygen), and stunted growth.   How Does Naloxone Work?   Naloxone is a jack of all trades in terms of the administration of the medicine. Naloxone can be injected and inhaled for fast acting relief; this is a critical boon of the medication, because during an overdose victims will not be able to breathe. Naloxone is saving lives. An overdose is induced when the body’s opiate receptors are overwhelmed with an opiate based substance, like heroin or vicodin. This exaggerated presence causes the central nervous system to depress, and prevents victims from breathing. Naloxone works like...